Citizen Science Projects: Human Impacts

Adopt-A-Stormdrain

The biggest threat to Lake Superior is stormwater pollution, the huge volume of water that runs off our rooftops, driveways, patios, sidewalks, and roads into the storm drain system when it rains or when snow melts. This runoff washes trash, dirt, fertilizer, pesticides, road salt, dog poop, and other pollutants directly into the nearest waterway. Rain rushing down the storm drain system can turn the rivers and streams into raging torrents that scour the stream banks, and sends tons of sediment and pollution into Lake Superior. The Adopt a Storm Drain Program is an effort to restore our area rivers and lakes by looking upstream to where their water comes from. Our rivers and lakes are not pristine environments and much of their water comes directly from roads and sidewalks through storm drain pipes. Our Adopt a Storm Drain Program accepts this reality and works to clean waterways by keeping the storm drains that feed them free from litter, leaves, and debris. Keeping debris away from the storm drains also reduces the chance of flooding in yards and homes in your neighborhood. This program is designed to recruit residents, neighborhoods, businesses, community groups, and youth to take sustained action to keep storm drains clear and clean. Volunteers will be provided with instructions to care for a storm drain or multiple drains on their street. Tasks include monitoring and removing debris from the storm drain(s) approximately once a week during the storm season. Hours will be tracked by the volunteer and submitted to the City after each clean-up or at the end of November.

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City of Superior Stormwater Utility

Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Sentry Program

The AIS Sentry Program educates and empowers community members to recognize and report aquatic invasive species throughout St. Louis County. The AIS Sentry Program helps prevent and limit the spread of AIS in waters throughout St. Louis County.

Sponsors

St. Louis River Alliance, St. Louis County’s Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program, Minnesota Sea Grant, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Great Lakes Worm Watch

Great Lakes Worm Watch is committed to increasing public understanding and appreciation of the role of exotic earthworms in ecosystems change across the region.

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University of Minnesota Duluth-Natural Resources Resarch Institute, National Science Foundation, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, The Northeast Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, The Coastal Zone Management Act, Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund, Boulder Lake Environmental Learning Center

Midwest Invasive Species Information Network

The goal of this regional resource is to assist both experts and citizen scientists in the detection and identification of invasive species in support of the successful management of invasive species.

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Michigan State University, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Michigan Natural Features Inventory, Michigan Department of Agriculture, Shedd Aquarium